Ultimate Bali detox recipe

bok-choy

Detox Day 7

So far, so good. I am one week into my detox and have to say I am feeling great. The first couple of days left me feeling a little light headed and plagued by  headaches, but by day three I was starting to feel like my system had been kick started and everything was working better. I have really enjoyed making the time to source organic vegetables and fruit and to prepare healthy and nutritious meals that I am eating mindfully. I have been eating spinach and bok choy almost every day, and this is one of my favourite recipes.

Wilted greens with garlic and sesame

  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced 1 large bunch spinach , stemmed
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp. sesame seeds for garnish

Warm oil in large fry pan  over medium-high heat. Add garlic and stir until lightly browned, about 45 seconds. Add greens (do in two batches if necessary) and toss until just wilted, 2 to 4 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Health benefits of bok choy

Dark leafy greens are a nutritional powerhouse, rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients like beta-carotene and lutein. Chlorophyll helps eliminate environmental toxins from heavy metals and pesticides  and helps to protect the liver. Some people find the bitterness of greens a little overbearing, however tossing greens with garlic, salt and pepper takes the edge off the bitterness, and sprinkling with sesame seeds adds some crunch.

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Bali Detox: Hummus and Tahini

2013-08-26 12.33.00 I have always loved hummus but for some reason it had never occurred to me to make it myself, but as my endeavour this week is to get creative in the kitchen and avoid buying anything processed the time has come to make my own hummus, and its actually way simpler than I thought. While I love sesame seeds I am  not a huge fan of tahini, so I made my first batch without any. It tasted great, but the next day I experimented with making my own tahini as well and adding a little to the hummus –  it tasted good as well, so its  just a matter of personal preference I guess.

When it comes to preparing the chick peas its always best to buy them dry, soak overnight and then boil until tender (about 1hour – 1 half hours) they hold their taste and form far better when prepared this way – whereas chick peas out of a can tend to be a little mushier.

Hummus Ingredients

  • 2 cups chick peas (soaked overnight and boiled till tender)

  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • sprig of parsley (finely chopped)

  • 2 teaspoons tahini (optional)

Method: Place the chick peas in a blender and mix until smooth. Add olive oil, crushed garlic, salt, cumin and tahini (optional). Lightly blend, serve sprinkled with parsley

Tahini recipe

  • 5 cups sesame seeds
  • 1 1/2 cups olive oil or vegetable oil

Preheat oven to 350. Toast sesame seeds for 5-10 minutes, tossing the seeds frequently with a spatula. Do not allow to brown. Cool for 20 minutes.

Pour sesame seeds into food processor and add oil. Blend for 2 minutes. Check for consistency. The goal is a thick, yet pourable texture. Add more oil and blend until desired consistency.

Bali Detox: Chick Pea salad

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Chick peas or garbanzo beans are a great source of protein and fibre and make a fabulous edition to a vegetarian diet, and will also help sustain you while detoxing.  They  have a low glycemic index and keep you feeling full – a powerful combination in helping control weight as you consume fewer calories. They are also highly versatile – and taste great sprinkled through a salad, mushed into falafel, or burgers, or crushed into humus.

  • 2 cups peeled diced cucumber, (cut lengthwise and scoop out seeds), diced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 medium onion, finely minced
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 cups garbanzo beans (soaked and cooked)
  • 3 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2-1/2 TBS chopped fresh mint
  • 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 medium head romaine lettuce, use tender whole leaves for bed

Combine all the vegetables and herbs then toss with lemon juice, olive oil and salt and pepper for a heart fresh salad.

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Detoxing in Bali

As I am going to be spending the next three weeks detoxing I have been doing some research into ingredients here in Bali that are perfect for purifying the body, and it seems that the island is bountiful in this regard.

Coconuts

The first rule of detoxing is to drink plenty of water, better yet, take advantage of the abundance of fresh green coconuts on the island – the ultimate drink for the tropics. Known as the tree of life, coconut is one of the nature’s healthiest gifts; amidst a myriad of health benefits, it is packed full of minerals and electrolytes, which helps keep the body nourished, hydrated and sustained. Drink straight from the shell with a little lime and ice.

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Pumpkin Seeds

The rich volcanic slopes of Bali produce tasty, nutrient rich pumpkins (known as ‘Emperor of the Sun’ in China) which are an excellent source of vitamins A, B and E, as well as powerful antioxidants, like carotene.  Even better, their seeds are rich in protein, amino acids, zinc, magnesium, and omega 3 fatty acids – all essential to the detox system. Pumpkin seeds have also proved highly effective in the removal of intestinal parasites which wreak havoc on the digestive system and contribute to the build up of toxins.  Seeds are best eaten raw or sprouted, or you can create pumpkin seed milk.  Take a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds, a quarter cup of pitted dates, a pinch of sea salt, one quarter teaspoon of vanilla extract and two and a half cups of water and purify in a blender for a tasty and effective way to cleanse the intestines.

Fruit

Bali abounds with lush tropical fruits that taste amazing and are brimming with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Papaya is packed full of enzymes that promote a healthy digestive system and contains one of the highest Vitamin C contents of all fruits. It is also high in Vitamin A and flavonoids like b-carotene and lutein which have strong anti oxidant properties. Mango, known as ‘The King of Fruits’ is similarly enzyme rich and high in Vitamin A  as well as potassium, magnesium, iron and copper. Dice fruit to make a fruit salad, or toss in the blender with a little water and ice for a luscious tropical juice. Try mixing banana and pineapple, or watermelon and papaya.

Kalamansi limes

The small limes that grow here in Bali have a slightly sweeter and milder taste than their larger lemony cousins. Packed with vitamin C, limes helps convert toxins into a water soluble form that can be easily excreted from the body.  Highly alkaline, they will restore the bodies PH balance, stimulate the digestive system, and hydrate the lymphatic system.  The best way to start your day is with a glass of warm water mixed with the juice of one squeezed lime.

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Beetroot
A valuable source of vitamins, iron, magnesium, zinc and calcium – all  necessary to promote  detoxification and elimination. Beets support good gallbladder and liver health – organs that are paramount for breaking down and removing toxins. The high amount of fibre in beetroot improves digestion and helps eliminate bodily waste. Luscious beets combined with carrots and ginger make a great cleansing juice.

Kankung (water spinach)

Slightly less bitter than other forms of spinach, Kangkung is a staple part of a Balinese village diet. As with all dark leafy greens, it is a nutritional powerhouse, rich in antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients like beta-carotene and lutein. Chlorophyll helps eliminate environmental toxins from heavy metals and pesticides, and helps to protect the liver. Take a bunch of spinach and wilt in a covered saucepan with a little water for a few minutes, then lightly stir fry with garlic, or simmer for a few minutes with some coconut milk for a healthy ‘creamed spinach.’

Garlic

Local garlic is not as strongly flavoured as European varieties, but has all the same benefits, such as promoting heart health, activating liver enzymes and enhancing the body’s immune cell activity. The component Allicin is a natural antibiotic and helps the body to halt the growth and reproduction of germs. To enhance the benefits of garlic, slice or press then leave for five minutes before cooking, or better yet, add raw to salad dressings.

Tumeric

Turmeric cleanses the liver gently and naturally. Often used in Ayurvedic medicine it is an antioxidant that boosts the creation and production of bile – necessary for breaking down fats and toxins. The compound substance Curcumin aids in treating gallstones. Turmeric blends well with lime and honey to form the basis of Jamu kunyit – a popular health tonic on the islands.

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Seaweed

The beaches of Nusa Dua, the Bukit and Lembongan are still farmed for seaweed, a traditional Balinese industry. The algin in seaweeds absorb toxins from the digestive tract and offers the broadest range of minerals of any food, containing virtually all the minerals found in the ocean. Seaweed is also a very powerful antioxidant that helps to alkalize the blood and strengthen the digestive tract. Mix with greens, and toasted pumpkin and sunflower seeds to make a great salad.

Cinnamon

The exotic flavour of cinnamon makes it popular in cooking, while Chinese medicine and Ayurveda have long revered cinnamon as a superpower used to treat things such as colds, indigestion and cramps, and to improve energy, vitality and circulation. Cinnamon heats the digestive fire – thus promoting healthy digestive system. It also has a natural cleansing action that stops the growth of microbes and kills bacteria and fungi. Cinnamon combines particularly well with honey to make a restorative tea.  

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Bali Detox

So, its been a while that I haven’t been feeling so fabulous – low energy, sniffly , poor digestion. It finally got to the point where I knew I had to take some positive steps and made an appointment with Bali Natural Healing Centre in Canggu http://www.balihealing.org/index.html I had heard really good things about Peggy Marienfeld – a naturopath from Germany who who been in Bali for several years.   She has a really sensible and balanced approach to healing and holistic well being and I warmed to her immediately.

I have always believe in a holistic approach to health but am sensible enough to know that sometimes the western path of medicine is the only way to go holistic v western but at other times – like now, the last thing I want to do is burden my overloaded system with harsh  synthetic drugs. It seems like my stomach needs some TLC not a chemical blitz, and so I am embarking on a detox/cleanse.  Peggy gave me a tincture of cloves, ginger, wormwood and black walnut to help clean out the parasites and my online research confirms that these are all commonly used herbs for parasites. I have to take this for three weeks, and have also stocked up on chlorophyll and probiotics. You see, my aim is removal and regeneration. I want to remove the toxins and parasites, but simultaneously restore the balance to my system. I have also stocked up my fridge with organic greens and am removing all sugar, wheat  and refined/processed food from my diet for the next couple of weeks. detox ingredients in Bali

Quite often I will just eat a salad for lunch and steamed vegetables and rice for dinner, however I know that I will quickly get very bored if this is all I eat for two weeks so I have vowed to be adventurous and to make cooking healthy, tasty and nutritious food  my mission. I started today with bok choy. Yes, I know its good for you – and I try to add it to my diet as often as possible – but really, its not my favourite food, yet there is a big bunch of it in my fridge (alongside some Sri Lankan spinach and some very dark green Kale.) I started thinking about a dish I used to love when I lived in Fiji –  palusani – water spinach cooked in coconut cream and this became the inspiration for my lunch.  At the risk of not sounding at all humble, I have to say it turned out to be divine. And went perfectly with my rice steamed with star anise, cardamom and cinnamon (who says rice is boring?)

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Ingredients: Spinach in coconut milk

  • 2 large bok choy, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, shredded
  • 1/2 head broccoli
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3/4 cup light coconut milk
  • 2 crushed garlic cloves
  • organic salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Steam the vegetables until wilted, then lightly sautee in olive oil.
  2. Add all other ingredients and stir until well combined and then simmer about ten minutes

Holistic v Western medicine

       

 While there are definite crossovers between western and holistic approaches to health – the two differ fundamentally in concept. To take a very generalised view, western medicine (known as allopathic) tends to focus on diagnosing and treating a specific illness once it occurs – it is designed to attack, and will often use pharmaceutical drugs to do so.  On the other hand, a holistic approach (derived from the Greek word halos for whole,) is not so much a system of  treating illness, but rather a way of preventing it in the first place, by promoting healthy living and integration of mind, body and spirit. It may (but not necessarily) favour alternative therapies or it may be used in conjunction with western treatment. Neither approach needs to be exclusive as each has its strength and weaknesses, so ideally they can be used to complement each other depending on given circumstances. Stay well and healthy and you will get sick less often, and thus have little need for western medicine, but when it comes to a sudden life or death scenario, it is the fast responding, western-trained A & E team who will probably save your life.

Holism

Although the term holism wasn’t coined until the 20th century, the practice dates back thousands of years. Chinese medicine and India’s ancient Ayurvedic traditions emphasised healthy living, while the ancient Greeks and Egyptians were herbalists, using  common plants and herbs for healing. In fact Hippocrates, (a physician in Greece in 400BC) who is  considered to be the father of modern medicine, had one foot in scientific reason and the other in the power of natural healing. He believed that the task of the physician was to help the healing process along rather than to take it over. A holistic approach to health fell out of favour with radical advances in allopathic medicine around the turn of the 20th century, but by the 1970’s it was making a resurgence . While some dismissed this practice as ‘new age,’  actually holism is about as ‘old age’ as it gets.

 

Prevention as a cure

There is, however, no denying the impact of advances in modern medicine, with developments such as antibiotics, neurosurgery, transplants, ultra sound, immunisations and so forth having a radical effect on the quality and quantity of human life. Until the 1800’s the average life expectancy was 30 – 40; in the ten generations since then it has doubled.  Obviously  increased sanitation, access to clean running water and better nutrition have a huge part to play in this shift – but there is no denying the crucial role  allopathic medicine has played.  Nevertheless, a valid argument is  that western medicine treats only the symptoms but not the underlying causes. Take recurring chronic sinusitis. You could take a course of antibiotics every time it occurs, or you could look at what is causing it – maybe a dust allergy, or perhaps too much dairy in your diet. Then by making some lifestyle changes you could prevent it.  Here in lies the difference. With western medicine, you go to the doctor to get healed, with a holistic approach the onus falls on YOU the individual. What about a wheat or dairy intolerance? There is no magic pharmaceutical pill to cure this, only you can heal yourself by changing your diet.

Again, when it comes to common colds and flu, many people will go rushing off to the doctor or pharmacist. But, there is no antibiotic that will attack a viral infection. Paracetemol and decongestants may give temporary relief, however your best bet is to rest, take Vitamin C and eat lots of garlic – which is proved to be anti viral, anti fungal and anti bacterial. In fact, regularly eating garlic in the cold season, or at the first sign of a cold will help prevent you getting ill, while a strong tea infused with ginger, garlic, lemon and honey will provide greater relief than over the counter medicine – and will also fight the virus and strengthen your immune system. Again, the onus is on the individual. If you pay attention to your body you will notice that you tend to get sick when you are run down, stressed or overworked and not eating properly. These are things that most of us can take some control over – should we choose to. We can redress the balance by joining a yoga class, eating well and doing things that make us feel happy.

The beauty of Holism is that it encourages awareness, and responsibility for our  own health, which makes total sense. But no matter how healthy we are, sooner or later we are all exposed to bacteria, succumb to genetic predispositions, or suffer from serious accidents and injuries, and at times there really is no disputing the power of western medicine. Managing chronic asthma is a good example of taking a combined holistic/western approach to well being. Avoiding triggers such as dust, smoking, dairy products and certain foods such as tomatoes can lessen the frequency of attacks, but when a really severe attack hits, the administration of hyrdrocortisone and oxygen in a hospital may be the only thing that prevents respiratory failure. And if your head is split open in a serious car accident – you are probably going to want the skilled neuro surgeon using advanced western techniques to be the one who treats you.

 

Reducing dependency on western medicine and synthetic drugs by  taking responsibility for your own health is a great thing, but  remember that sometimes taking responsibility for your own health means visiting the doctor. While it is well documented that many people successfully treat cancer holistically – your greatest chance of survival is to detect it early (while it is still isolated and treatable) through medical imaging or blood screening.

Perhaps the best way forward is not to debate holistic v western, but rather to embrace the notion of holistic & western.

 

 

Published in Kula Magazine July 2013

 

 

Fivelements Puri Ahimsa

Fivelements, Puri Ahimsa sits at the end of a narrow country lane surrounded by rice paddys and fields of ripening corn. Thatched circular buildings with conical roofs reach for the sky, the gardens are filled with lush foliage, and the gushing of a fast flowing river  intermingles with birdsong.

From the moment I step onto the property I become aware of a shift in energy, a higher vibration. Perhaps it’s the convergence of eight energy lines that run through the property; maybe it’s the all-pervasive concept of ‘Love in Action,’ or possibly it’s the ritualistic Agni Hotra fires that are lit at dawn and dusk each day to purify the property. I have a traditional Balinese healing treatment that is a mix of reflexology and chakra balancing with Pak Dewa, a wonderful and powerful energy healer. At times the session is painful and I shed tears,  but by the end my spirit is soaring. Afterwards I sit on the verandah drinking ginger tea and reflecting on my life and my need to restore balance.That evening I join the Agni Hotra  fire purification ceremony, with Balinese priests leading us through a powerful ritual that includes throwing beans, seeds and incense into the fire, to symbolise cleansing, healing and forgiveness, while coconuts are smashed to signify the breakdown of ego. Through it all mantras are chanted, bells are rung and prayers recited.

The Balinese concept of Tri Hita Karana ‘creating a harmonious relationship to God, other human beings and to nature,’ is integrated in every aspect of the design. Local priests provided spiritual guidance in the layout of the resort, while international environmental consultants were consulted to minimize the ecological impact. Thoughtful construction utilizes  bamboo, riverstone, coconut wood and recycled teak and mimics the curves, colors and rawness of nature. Sustainable practices include effective waste management, low energy consumption and  efficient use of water resources; all  contributing  to making this one of the most sustainable eco conscious resorts on the island.

But just because it is sustainable doesn’t mean it cuts any corners when it comes to luxury. Five sumptuous sleeping pavilions have decadent outdoor bathrooms, private decks with sunken tubs, high tech chromo graphic lighting, and handpicked antiques, while the spa specialises in organic treatments concocted in the spa laboratory and the restaurant serves the most exquisite raw food on the island – truly food for the soul.

http://www.fivelements.org